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Trait Judgments: How Correctly are They? Combining Trait Judgments With Real Personalities.

Detail Summary
Date 12 December 2013
Time 11:00 - 12:00

Abstract

We judge other people by their appearances, but are our judgements correct? Earlier research focused on the judgments of faces, without knowing anything about the people on the pictures. We tried to answer this question by letting 100 participants judge pictures of about 700 people who participated in the ID1000 project (this project was set up to see the differences in brains and behavior in a group representing the Dutch population). In the ID1000 project not only pictures were taken, they also collected data through questionnaires and a structural MRI scan. The judgements of these people were correlated with the structural MRI scan, the significant brain area was extracted, and this area was used in a regression with the Eigenfaces we generated from the pictures used in this experiment, the last step was to regress this to the judgements again to see which traits correlated with the brain structures and faces. This was done for male and female separately, both had a different significant brain region and different traits that correlated with that brain region. For females the significant trait was extraversion, and for males the significant traits were dominance and openness.This research was purely explorative. We did not know if we would find a brain structure of which one it would be. We had to conclude that the findings are most likely based on small signs of emotion in the faces (like a smile). To be truly able to tell if our judgments of people based on faces is correct it would be necessary to repeat this research with better pictures (e.g., more focused on hair out of the face, everyone wearing the same color t-shirt, and making sure they look neutral by testing that first).

Supervisor

 

Andries van der Leij

Location

Soutterain of building D at Roeterseiland. Exact location will follow.