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The CSCA Symposium on Impulsivity and Inhibition will be held on June 30 and July 1, 2011. This Symposium can be attended separately from the CSCA Summer School 'To Head or to Heed? Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Impulsivity and the Inhibition of Thought and Action'.

Detail Summary
Date Start 30 June 2011 End 1 July 2011

The CSCA Symposium on Impulsivity and Inhibition will be held on June 30 and July 1, 2011. This Symposium can be attended separately from the CSCA Summer School 'To Head or to Heed? Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Impulsivity and the Inhibition of Thought and Action'.

Programme Thursday, June 30

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09:15 - 09:45

Registration

09:45 - 10:00

Welcome and introduction

10:00 - 10:45

Nico Frijda - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Title and abstract t.b.a.

10:45 - 11:30

Bruce Bartholow - University of Missouri, Columbia, USA
Title and abstract t.b.a.

11:30 - 12:00

Coffee / tea

12:00 - 12:45

Reinout Wiers - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Title and abstract t.b.a.

12:45 - 13:45

Lunch (in REC-A)

13:45 - 14:30

Tommy Pattij - VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherland
Title and abstract t.b.a.

14:30 - 15:30

Student debate
Summer School students debate with each other and the audience about various topics related to the Summer School and Symposium.

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee / tea

16:00 - 16:45

Trevor Robbins - University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Title and abstract t.b.a.

16:45 - 17:30

Panel discussion chaired by Adele Diamond

Programme Friday, July 1

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09:30 - 10:00

Registration

10:00 - 10:45

Frederick Verbruggen - University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
Title and abstract t.b.a.

10:45 - 11:30

Angela Yu - University of California, San Diego, USA

Optimal decision-making in inhibitory control
Inhibitory control, the dynamic ability to modify or cancel inappropriate actions in response to changing task demands, is an important aspect of cognitive function. I will present a normative model of inhibitory control in the stop signal task, in which a prepotent "go" response is sometimes interrupted by a "stop" signal. I will demonstrate that optimal integration of prior expectation with accumulating sensory evidence (Bayesian inference) and continual weighing of the relative value of "go" and "stop" (Bayes risk
minimization) naturally give rise to the array of behavioral phenomenon observed in the task, including contextual effects such as statistical frequency and motivational factors. I will also show where some of the necessary computations are carried out in the brain, using model-based analysis of fMRI data. Finally, I will discuss the role of the neuromodulator norepinephrine as a signal for unexpected uncertainty, by showing how the normative model can account for behavioral alteration due to atomoxetine, which is an approved ADHD drug and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

11:30 - 12:00

Coffee / tea

12:00 - 12:45

Richard Ridderinkhof - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Title and abstract t.b.a.

12:45 - 14:00

Lunch + Student poster session (in REC-A)

14:00 - 14:45

Roshan Cools - Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

The paradox of dopamine and impulsivity
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is well known to be accompanied by impulse control deficits, which contribute to drug and other addictions. Consistent with dopamine’s role in reward and motivation, these problems may result from the dopaminergic medication that is used to treat the motor and cognitive symptoms of the disease. Thus we have put forward the dopamine overdose hypothesis, which states that medication doses that are necessary to remedy the severe lack of dopamine in the dorsal striatum detrimentally overdose relatively intact dopamine levels in the ventral striatum. According to this hypothesis, impulse control deficits in PD reflect aberrant impact of reward due to overdosed dopamine levels in the ventral striatum. In this talk I will review the evidence in favour of this model, but also highlight other factors that contribute to impulsive behaviour, including genetic and trait vulnerability associated with low baseline dopamine function. Consistent with this observation, we have recently obtained evidence that aberrant effects of reward in Parkinson’s disease are associated with dopamine depletion. The current talk highlights this paradoxical relationship between dopamine and impulsivity.

14:45 - 15:30

Rogier Mars - University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Cortical and subcortical interactions during action reprogramming: Insights from transcranial magnetic stimulation
Cognitive control is traditionally seen as the prerogative of the frontal cortex. According to one of the most popular models of control, the frontal cortex is responsible for biasing information processing in posterior brain areas, i.e., top-down control. However, it remains to be established how this control is implemented, which specific areas of the frontal cortex are involved, and whether these areas really have a causal influence on activity in other brain areas. We have recently focused on a specific situation of top-down control, namely the inhibition of an ongoing motor program and the selection of an alternative, so-called action reprogramming. In this talk, I will discuss a number of studies investigating the nature of top-down control during action reprogramming using a variety of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) approaches. First, we used paired-pulse TMS to establish the specific involvement of two subregions of the frontal cortex, the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), in biasing activity in the motor cortex. Second, we combined paired-pulse TMS with diffusion-weighted imaging to establish which white matter pathways mediate the interaction between frontal and more posterior brain areas. Third, we combined paired-pulse TMS with another TMS approach, the so-called ‘virtual lesion’ repetitive to investigate the results of interference with pre-SMA function on cortico-cortical interactions. Finally, we look at processes internal to the primary motor cortex, the recipient area of the pre-SMA and rIFG top-down control. Together, these studies indicate how TMS can provide a unique window on the way in which the brain implements control.

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee / tea

16:00 - 16:45

Jan de Houwer - Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
Title and abstract t.b.a.

16:45 - 17:30

Panel discussion chaired by Adele Diamond

17:30 - 18:30

Drinks

Costs and registration

Costs for the Symposium will be as follows:

  • A passepartout for the Symposium (i.e. attendance of both days) is €90,-. You will receive an invoice for this upon registration (see below). Please make sure this invoice is paid before June 20.
  • Registration for only Thursday or only Friday is €60,-. You will receive an invoice for this upon registration (see below). Please make sure this invoice is paid before June 20.
  • Registration costs are waived for researchers within the CSCA, as well as CSCA students who also participate in the summer school as part of their master curriculum.
  • As a special offer, master students who do not participate in the summer school, pay €30,- for one day or €45,- for both days (i.e., a 50% discount).

Deadline for registration for the Symposium: June 1, 2011.

Roeterseilandcampus - building M
Roeterseilandcampus - building M

Plantage Muidergracht 12
1018 TV Amsterdam

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